Welcome to Intercepts!


Welcome to Intercepts — the new EIA blog. Here you will find the latest inside information on public education and the teachers’ unions. The weekly EIA Communique’ will not change, but Intercepts will bring you news as it happens, fold in the best aspects of School News Monitor, and allow you, the reader, to post your comments to each item that appears here.

Please be patient, as EIA is incorporating a lot of web site changes and tech procedure upgrade all at once. There are bound to be a few glitches, but I’m sure things will settle into a routine relatively quickly.

So, thanks for joining us. Explore the rest of the web site and we’ll get started as soon as possible.

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10 thoughts on “Welcome to Intercepts!”

  1. Welcome to the Blogosphere, Mike. I will post about your new blog and encourage folks to add you to their blogroll, as I have.

  2. I wondered how South Carolina could have one administrator for every 171 teachers. That just did not pass the smell test so I went one school district’s website (Charleston) and counted the number of building principals (86). Charleston has 3,226 teachers. That ratio is 37.5 to 1. I did not count central office administration or support administration. My guess is that the data that Mike printed is absolutely wrong.

  3. Welcome indeed! This ought to prove refresing… I am adding you to my links list! Keep up the good work Mike.

  4. Thanks for stopping by, everyone. As for anonymous — well, if you would read the table it distinctly says DISTRICT-LEVEL administrators and not SCHOOL-SITE administrators. So your check of Charleston’s principals has no relation to the data in the table, which was compiled by the U.S. Department of Education from reports of each state office of education. Keep posting, though. I’m sure you’ll catch me in a mistake if you keep trying.

  5. Ted Kolderie once reported that Linda Darling-Hammond says that in Japan 80 % of the staff are classroom teachers. In the US only 43% are.

    Steve Buckstein of the Cascade Policy Institute once computed the centreal office administrator to teacher ratio of both the Archdiocese in Portland and the Portland Public Schools. The PPS ratio was 25 times higher than the Archdiocese ratio.

    Congrats to you, Mike, for being an erstwhile blogger long before you adopted the trappings.

  6. Mike: with your store of knowledge you may already know this but even the late Al Shanker, as AFT president, noted that New York City schools had as many administrators as France, and New York State had as many as all of the nations of western Europe combined.

  7. Thanks, Daryl. No RSS yet, but expect more stuff to be added as I expand my comfort zone.

  8. Welcome to the EduSphere! I’m looking forward to making your site one of our daily reads.

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