Intercepts

A listening post monitoring public education and teachers’ unions.

Official NEA Membership Numbers for 2009-10

Written By: Mike Antonucci - Jun• 27•11

It took an extra few months, but here are NEA’s membership numbers for 2009-10. They don’t have a specific date, but traditionally they have been computed in May, in time for the end of the school year. Since most layoffs, retirements and “profession departures” occur during the summer, this represents a rosier picture than it would in September.

NEA’s retired membership is growing (up 9,200 in the last year) but it’s coming at the expense of active membership, that is, teachers and education support employees working in public school districts. NEA reports 3,204,185 total members, of whom 2,866,063 are active.

Here is the breakdown of each state’s active members, along with the percentage change from 2008-09.

ALABAMA – 75,590 (down 0.9%)

ALASKA – 11,567 (up 3.8%)

ARIZONA – 29,617 (down 5.2%)

ARKANSAS – 12,847 (down 4.4%)

CALIFORNIA – 309,714 (down 4.2%)

COLORADO – 36,991 (up 3.7%)

CONNECTICUT – 37,833 (down 0.6%)

DELAWARE – 11,037 (up 0.9%)

FLORIDA – 129,001 (down 0.9%)

GEORGIA – 33,109 (down 1.9%)

HAWAII – 12,439 (down 1.2%)

IDAHO – 11,608 (down 0.3%)

ILLINOIS – 130,875 129,841 (up 0.8%)

INDIANA – 46,275 (down 2.6%)

IOWA – 36,076 (down 0.9%)

KANSAS – 25,462 (down 3.6%)

KENTUCKY – 31,684 (down 1.6%)

LOUISIANA – 15,005 (up 4.4%)

MAINE – 20,606 (up 0.3%)

MARYLAND – 66,772 (up 0.3%)

MASSACHUSETTS – 99,162 (down 0.3%)

MICHIGAN – 124,076 (down 3.8%)

MINNESOTA – 74,310 (7 fewer members)

MISSISSIPPI – 5,244 (down 4.5%)

MISSOURI – 29,770 (down 0.1%)

MONTANA – 14,166 (up 2.3%)

NEBRASKA – 22,033 (down 0.8%)

NEVADA – 25,974 (down 3.9%)

NEW HAMPSHIRE – 15,899 (up 0.9%)

NEW JERSEY – 178,723 (down 0.6%)

NEW MEXICO – 8,261 (up 0.4%)

NEW YORK – 393,883 (down 1.5%)

NORTH CAROLINA – 44,970 (down 6.3%)

NORTH DAKOTA – 7,264 (up 2.3%)

OHIO – 119,237 (down 0.2%)

OKLAHOMA – 23,284 (down 2.9%)

OREGON – 41,404 (down 2.5%)

PENNSYLVANIA – 158,982 (up 0.3%)

RHODE ISLAND – 9,038 (down 1.1%)

SOUTH CAROLINA – 7,180 (down 10.1%)

SOUTH DAKOTA – 5,810 (down 0.1%)

TENNESSEE – 46,694 (down 1.2%)

TEXAS – 46,550 (up 5.7%)

UTAH – 17,687 (down 2.7%)

VERMONT – 10,872 (up 0.8%)

VIRGINIA – 53,913 (down 4.2%)

WASHINGTON – 79,143 (down 1.2%)

WEST VIRGINIA – 11,044 (down 4.6%)

WISCONSIN – 86,456 (down 1.5%)

WYOMING – 5,754 (down 1.3%)

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA – 323 (down 12.9%)

FEDERAL – 5,866 (up 3.0%)

HAWAII-UHPA – 3,130 (up 2.6%)

UTAH-USEA – 5,720 (down 1.5%)

DIRECT – 133 (down 14.2%)

NATIONAL TOTAL – 2,866,063 (down 1.4%)

UPDATE: Oops. Illinois was inadvertently omitted. Corrected now.

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4 Comments

  1. Jim Stegall says:

    Mike, is there any way to break down those numbers by actual classroom teachers vs. other education support personnel? I seem to recall that NEA used to be more specific about that, but lately it’s been very difficult to see how many members are really actual educators (classroom teachers and administrators), as opposed to others who happen to work at a school. I’m guessing that here in North Carolina there must be around 4-5K of these ‘others’ in their figures.

  2. Mike Antonucci says:

    I don’t have the figures state-by-state, but nationally 1.9 million NEA members are teachers and other certificated professionals (guidance counselors, speech pathologists, etc.) and 340,000 are education support. All numbers are full-time equivalent. The number of human bodies are, naturally, higher.

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